Pot, Mary Jane, Weed, Skunk--You get the idea!

Rednekcowboy

Owner
Staff member
Now I'm not a pot smoker myself but don't care if someone else is. Growing up, my father was a big puffer.

Why am I bringing this up and where is this heading?

The other day, I renewed my lease with my landlord and he pointed out that the only thing changed was that pot is not allowed in the building and that he was raising my rent $20/month. This is a small building--triplex with 4 units. I'm in the basement, he is on the second floor and two small units on the top floor. He stated he knows legalization is coming in Quebec and he wanted to ensure his kids, as well as mine, were not exposed.

This got me thinking, is he within his rights to put this in the lease if it actually does become legal?
 

nekkidtruth

Administrator
Staff member
I don't believe this would stand up in court once it's been legalized. It would be like saying "You're not allowed to have cigarettes in the building". Keeping in mind there is a distinction between having it in the building and smoking it. Going further, pot can be used in all sorts of different ways aside from smoking it.

While I completely understand the point he's trying to make, I don't believe he as the right legally. Buuuuut....I'm not a lawyer so what do I know ;)
 

Rednekcowboy

Owner
Staff member
Not that it matters to me either way but thought it was an interesting point that he put it in the lease--especially if it's legalized.

Then again, cigarettes are legal and the majority of apartments out there specify non-smoking....
 

nekkidtruth

Administrator
Staff member
Well there's also a distinction between smoking specifically and being allowed on the property. While you could say "No smoking in my apartments", I don't think you can legally say "You can't have cigarettes in my apartments". I would imagine the same would apply to pot. Another example would be "You can't have tobacco on my property" because you don't want people smoking, but someone who chews tobacco could easily win in court.
 

Rednekcowboy

Owner
Staff member
Is there rent control in Quebec?
In Ontario, there is a maximum rent can be raised.


My building got a notice that growing pot on my building is not allowed.
Ya, I'm not sure what the max allowable is but I've been here almost 5 years and the guy has never raised rent once in all that time. I don't mind the $20 a month and he told me like 6 months in advance and apologized for doing so.

The landlord here is great. He's let me slide when I hit some rough times, he never complains about noise even though my surround sound gets too loud for my own kids some times lol. He is great to get along with and very easy going.

I can't blame him for the pot. He has kids the same age as mine plus has older relatives living with him. There was a guy that lived in 1 of the one bedrooms on the top floor and that was all you could smell throughout the whole building the whole time he was here.

If it was just me, I wouldn't care but I don't want my kids exposed to that or be responsible for them being exposed to that.
 

El Quintron

Administrator
Staff member
IANAL, but he's within his rights to ban smoking, but he's likely loose a court battle if it stretched to consumption. Assuming you smoked and wanted to continue doing so, you could probably get away with Vaping or somesuch
 

El Quintron

Administrator
Staff member
I figured I'd drag this back to the forefront as weed has been legal for 2-3 months now and the world hasn't ended.

Also Ontario's retail situation on this front in Pathetic, I went to New Brunswick and they had stores open right after legalization.
 

bobnoxe

Junior Member
I just read somewhere this morning that the "licensed" market is not creating enough product. I get my weed from a MOM in BC, probably not legal, but meh, good selection, decent prices. Stuff I will not get from OCS or "my guy".

The only issue is CP they can be so damn slow 4 days from BC using Xpressspost, which is supposed to be 2 days.

[bquote]
Despite the persistent media buzz, there are no cannabis supply shortages in Canada, Brock University pot industry expert Michael Armstrong explains matter-of-factly.
“There’s all kinds of cannabis in Canada,” says Armstrong, who teaches operations management at the St. Catharines school. “It’s the legal cannabis that we’re short of.”


And to successfully compete with a stocked and still-thriving illegal market, the country’s licensed cannabis producers must — among a series of moves — ramp up their crop outputs exponentially, offer cheaper, more varied strains and get them into a vastly increased number of stores. [/bquote]

https://www.thestar.com/news/cannabis/2019/02/01/why-legal-cannabis-growers-cant-compete-with-the-black-market-yet.html
 

El Quintron

Administrator
Staff member
The legal market will catch up eventually, generally speaking if consumers are willing to buy all the legal product before going back to the illegal market then it does saw some good about the legal market.
 
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